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http://www.guampdn.com/article/20100404/LIFESTYLE/4040319/This+month+in+Guam+History

April 2, 1672 -- 338 years ago -- Padre Diego Luis de Sanvitores was killed by Chamorro chiefs Matapang and Irao of Tumon. The missionary had baptized Matapang's infant daughter against the wishes of the Chamorro chief. Also killed was Padre Sanvitores' assistant, Pedro Calangsor, a 14-year-old Filipino boy.

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http://www.guampdn.com/article/20090726/LIFESTYLE/907260315/Book+immortalizes+Filipino+legacy

 

Book immortalizes Filipino legacy

By Amritha Alladi • Pacific Sunday News • July 26, 2009

 

  They came, they slogged, and then, they were forgotten.

 

Remnants of their labor still stand as landmarks in Guam today, but as symbols of the island's progress and not as evidence of their efforts.

 

However, with the release of "A Journey Home: Camp Roxas and Filipino American History in Guam," a 40-page illustrated catalog, the Guam Humanities Council plans to immortalize the contributions of the Filipinos who sailed to Guam in pursuit of "opportunity."

 

"It's a little known part of Guam's history," said Guam Humanities Council Executive Director Kimberlee Kihleng. "You find that there's very little archival information."

 

Camp Roxas, a labor camp established by the U.S. government on Guam after World War II, was designed to implement the infrastructure necessary to rebuild the naval base, and much of the island, post-Japanese occupation. More than 10,000 Filipino migrant workers arrived from Iloilo, sacrificing the comforts of their country to start a new life of long hours, meager pay and an unknown future.

 

Memories

This catalog will immortalize their legacy, as proceeds from its sales will go back into producing more catalogs to spread the message, Kihleng said.

 

The idea for the project was suggested in 2007 by Bernadette P. Schumann, daughter of former camp member Loreto P. Provido, and producer of the documentary film "Under the American Sun." Since then, the humanities council has been working to finally unveil this period of Guam's past with help from a grant by the National Endowment Fund, but the memory of camp life remains fresh in the minds of its former workers. They remember it as the catalyst that propelled them to their current prosperity.

 

"Without Camp Roxas, I'd never be as successful in all my civil service (jobs)," said Johnny Luces, who was a member of Camp Roxas as an automotive repair worker for the Navy. "It was the main factor in my success."

 

Luces left the Philippines at the age of 18 with only an elementary education. But through his stint at Camp Roxas, he learned to speak English, worked with computers, and trained to ultimately become a respected structural planner and estimator for the civil service.

 

"My mentality is, 'you want to be successful? Do it,'" he said, sharing the advice he's given his family.

 

Today, the 77-year-old proudly shows off graduation photos of his seven children, all draped in caps and gowns. He said now they will become the driving force behind Guam's growth, as he once was.

 

But other immigrants were not as fortunate to pick up new skills at the camp. For some, it was a step down in exchange for the chance to carve out a new future.

 

Finally, recognition

Leonilo P. Alger, 76, another Camp Roxas member, said many professional immigrants had degrees or certification to work as attorneys, nurses or engineers in the Philippines, but were not recognized for those skills here. Instead, they worked as laborers, he said.

 

Alger, who obtained both business and accounting degrees in the Philippines, started work at the naval base's engineering section as a helper until he became a surveyor. He recalls the maggot-infested rice that was sometimes served to workers en masse, and the cramped vehicles-- sometimes packed with almost 100 laborers-- that transported them to the work site and back.

 

Still, Alger said he doesn't feel resentment that the Filipino contribution to Guam has been pushed aside -- he, like Luces, is thankful for the opportunity he was given to work. For him, the relationship with Guam was symbiotic.

 

"To me it is both ways -- the opportunities for me to have a better life, and their opportunity to make use of what I can give to the community," he said. "So it's two ways."

 

Nonetheless, the former members are thrilled to see that someone has finally recognized their work.

My mentality is, 'you want to be successful? Do it,'" he said, sharing the advice he's given his family.

 

Today, the 77-year-old proudly shows off graduation photos of his seven children, all draped in caps and gowns. He said now they will become the driving force behind Guam's growth, as he once was.

 

But other immigrants were not as fortunate to pick up new skills at the camp. For some, it was a step down in exchange for the chance to carve out a new future.

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http://www.saipantribune.com/newsstory.aspx?newsID=91427&cat=3

Excerpt:

ConGen Wilfredo DL Maximo

 

By Jaime R. Vergara
Special to the Saipan Tribune

The unfinished documentary, Under the American Sun, emerged out of a Guam Humanities Council and National Endowment for Humanities project for a photo exhibit, discussion series and a short 10-minute film commemorating the 60th year anniversary of the Filipino workers recruited after World War II beginning 1946 to assist in the reconstruction of Guam from the devastation of war.

For two decades, over 10,000 Filipino men and women migrated to Guam and settled at Camp Roxas in Agat, resulting in several generations of Filipino who integrated into American citizenry, enriching further the genetics and culture of the Guam community.

One of those construction workers was 32-year old Felix Pangindian Maximo Jr., of Quezon province, father of departing Consul General Wilfredo Maximo of the Consulate General of the Republic of the Philippines on Saipan.

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http://www.guampdn.com/article/20090913/COMMUNITIES/909130304/1054/Filipino+Pride++Group+wants+young+Filipinos+to+be+proud+of+heritage

Filipino Pride: Group wants young Filipinos to be proud of heritage

By Amritha Alladi • Bayanihan • September 13, 2009

                                

When Dale David visited Boston in 2000, he was disappointed to see Filipino-Americans hiding behind designer clothes and Western accents. David approached one, asking, "Hey boy, are you Pinoy?" but the young man ignored him and continued to converse in his "polished American accent."

Fearing that the Filipino identity was lost and further distressed that Filipinos were ashamed to identify themselves as such, David was inspired to define Filipino pride and spread those sentiments to his people.

"Filipino Pride" a booklet released this year by the Guam chapter of Filipino Matters, is a compilation of essays that recounts the stories of significant figures and events in Filipino history and the current era. The essays are an easy read, each of which should take no longer than a few minutes, according to Filipino Matters volunteer Jeff David, Dale David's brother.

"Nation building is more than building bridges and infrastructure. It's about nurturing our self-esteem, our pride and our love for our homeland," Jeff David says.

The first volume of the series, containing 64 essays, was released this year in February, and Jeff David says members of Filipino Matters are currently touring the Philippines to promote the book sales there. The essays are short to give people the chance to read one essay a day. Jeff David says his organization is aiming to compile 365 essays to give people an opportunity to read a new essay each day of the year.

INSPIRATION

"We thought that this little piece of book would inspire and give awareness to a small number of people, and that will multiply and share that to another hundred people."

The essays are contributed by volunteer freelance writers in the Philippines and Guam , with subjects spanning art, culture, politics, history and famous figures. One essay is about boxing world champion Manny Pacquiao, and his rise as the "best pound-for-pound boxer right now," beating both Oscar De La Hoya and Ricky Hatton. At the end of every essay is a short summary, Jeff David says.

"We write explaining to the reader why the story is important in instilling Pinoy pride."

Jeff David says the only link a lot of kids who are born and raised outside of the Philippines have to their motherland is the television and the newspaper, and perhaps a few gatherings at which they may speak Tagalog or Ilocano. This book is meant to show the Filipino youth that there is more to the Philippines than the images of crime, congestion and pollution that are portrayed in the media.

He says the goal is to distribute the books at no charge to schools and public libraries, although right now only a few copies are available.

Members of Filipino Matters have used their personal resources to fund production of the booklet and are relying on its sales to produce more. They are currently taking entries for the subsequent volumes, and anyone who has the time to share interesting stories from the Philippines is welcome to contribute, Jeff David says.

"You don't have to be a Filipino to be a part of this book," he says.

We write explaining to the reader why the story is important in instilling Pinoy pride."

Jeff David says the only link a lot of kids who are born and raised outside of the Philippines have to their motherland is the television and the newspaper, and perhaps a few gatherings at which they may speak Tagalog or Ilocano. This book is meant to show the Filipino youth that there is more to the Philippines than the images of crime, congestion and pollution that are portrayed in the media.

He says the goal is to distribute the books at no charge to schools and public libraries, although right now only a few copies are available.

Members of Filipino Matters have used their personal resources to fund production of the booklet and are relying on its sales to produce more. They are currently taking entries for the subsequent volumes, and anyone who has the time to share interesting stories from the Philippines is welcome to contribute, Jeff David says.

"You don't have to be a Filipino to be a part of this book," he says

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 http://www.mabuhayradio.com/content/view/2678/51/

Guam – together with the Philippines and Puerto Rico – became occupied territories of the United States as a result of the Spanish-American War of 1898. As a Spanish colony, it was ruled by the Spanish governor general based in Manila, Philippines. About 27% of the people of Guam are of Filipino descent. One can read more of Guam in this link CIA - The World Factbook -- Guam.

Bernie Schumann advised us today of his group’s website, which features a film documentary on Camp Roxas in Agat, Guam. The URL is: http://www.camproxas.com

The "Return to Camp Roxas: The Film" (working title) project recounts a little-known chapter of American history. It is the story of skilled and unskilled laborers and professionals recruited from the Philippines' Iloilo Province by the United States military to rebuild Guam. The island was then devastated by years of Japanese occupation and the war.

The efforts of Bernie Schumann and Company are commendable. But there is more to be done even in the category of documentary films. When this writer worked in Guam in 1972, he tried to do research on the Filipino revolutionary leaders exiled by the United States to that island after the Christian Filipino-American War of 1899 to 1902. Among those exiled to Guam was a
Bicolano hero, Julian Gerona, of Bulan, Sorsogon.
Some of the Filipino exiles died in Guam and their remains were buried there. This writer has proposed identifying (through DNA testing) the remains of these Filipino revolutionary heroes that were buried in Guam and also in another former Spanish colony, the Island of Fernando Po (spelled also as “Poo”). Please read a related article, Correcting Bicol History and Remembering the Bicolano (and Filipino) Heroes Exiled to Africa

Then there is a need for Guam (and the United States) to join the Philippines, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Italy and some 15 other countries (as the crew supposedly came from 18 different countries) in commemorating the 500th anniversary of the voyage of an Spanish expedition led by Fernando de Magallanes (Ferdinand Magellan). The Magellan-led voyage started in Seville, Spain, in September 1519. It will only be, therefore, a matter of 11 years before the Magellan-led expedition’s 500th year. Magellan and his crew “discovered” (for the Old World) the islands of Guam, Samar, Leyte and Cebu in March-April 1521. More details in the proposed international celebration of the Magellan-led Spanish expedition from 2019-2022 will be published in our sister website, www.magellan2021.com, which is still a section of the www.mabuhayradio.com. # # #

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Frankfort Roundabout: n. Saturday, February 16, 1901.

... From lIuniJlhTi mea Job 7 GOVERNMENT DECIDES TO DEPORT REBEL LEADERS TO GUAM ISLAND ... del os SantosColonels Macario de Ocampo Esteban Consorted Lucas Cam erino Julian Gerona ...

kdl.kyvl.org/static/news/franews/franews_KUK-fra1901021601.html - [cache] - Bing

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